May 2022

31
May

Examples of alternative activities to water scarcity in Boulacounda, Senegal, February 2022

 The scarcity of rainfall means that the lowlands no longer fill up with water as they used to. This has a negative impact on rice production. In order to make ends meet, the women of the village have started alternative activities such as collecting stones. They divide into groups to collect stones to sell them to truckers from Tambacounda.

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31
May

Access to water for herders in Wassadou, Senegal, February 2022

This report reflects the daily life of the pastoralists of Wassadou. They face the same difficulties in accessing water as the women in some areas of the small village on the national road in the Tambacounda region. By: Adama Dansokho Households and difficulties in accessing drinking water Wassadou, Senegal, February 2022 Women face enormous difficulties in accessing drinking water. The

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31
May

Overview of the rainy season, Bandafassi, Senegal, February 2022

It rained this year but not like other years. The rain started early but there were breaks in the rainfall, so it did not rain continuously. This discouraged many farmers. Then the rain came back but it was a bit late. For those who sowed at that time, the seedlings did not reach maturity, so the groundnuts and maize did

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30
May

Third training workshop for village communication relays, 28 February to 3 March 2022, Damaro (Guinea)

The third workshop of the Watigueleya Kélê project took place in Damaro, Guinea, from Monday 28 February to Thursday 3 March 2022. The workshop focused on theatre as a means of raising awareness about the effects of climate change. The objective was to train village communication relays to develop and perform skits on the theme of climate resilience, so that

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30
May

Newsletter #5 – Introduction

This spring newsletter is largely dominated by the activities of the last workshop that took place in Damaro (Guinea), from 28 February to 3 March 2022. All the village communication relays were able to gather again, discuss their latest reports and above all take part in a theatre workshop led by the Malian theatre specialist Aboubacar Diarra. Statistical reports of

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30
May

Why training rural people in West Africa in advocacy: an interview with Illia Djadi

Illia Djadi, a former BBC journalist and advocacy expert, has provided several advocacy trainings to village relays of the Watigueleya Kèlê project (Climate Resilience in West Africa). In order to provide them with advocacy skills and techniques applicable at the local level, he gave a first training to villagers from the three project countries (Mali, Guinea, Senegal) in Bandafassi in

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30
May

Presentation of the book Djiguiba Camara in the village of Damaro, March 2022

In March 2022, Marie Rodet and Elara Bertho presented the book Djiguiba Camara, Essai d’histoire locale (available in free access here) to the descendants of the Camara family in the village of Damaro, a partner of the Watigueleya Kèlê project. The book traces the long history of the Camara migrations, accounts of the founding of the village, resistance to French

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30
May

Preservation of the Nakotou forest, around Damaro, Guinea, November 2021

Ansoumane Camara in the Nakotou forest, one and a half kilometres from Damaro centre. From now on, when a tree is cut down (for a funeral or other reason), the community obliges to reforest in the forest, in return. This forest has always existed and the climate is very mild. The aim is to reforest the whole of Damaro.  

30
May

Mutual aid groups during the rice harvest, Mandou, Guinea, October 2021

The mutual aid group in the field of an inhabitant of Mandou during the rice harvest in the presence of the village delegate of Mandou, Moussa Camara. It is October and there has been no rain for a fortnight already. The youth are getting organised to help the owner of the field to face the challenges of climate change.   

30
May

Growing okra in Bossoko, Guinea, November 2021

I am talking about agriculture: the cultivation of okra. Before, we used to grow long-lasting crops. For reasons of climate change and lack of water, I turned to okra, which lasts only two months and two weeks. Okra is useful in the sense that we eat it fresh, dry, with rice, fonio, to (food made from cassava). Once ground, we

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